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, tyler, all about the federal reserve and the economy. >> and cyprus in there for good measure. it was a very busy news day. we're here to tell you all about it. the federal reserve did it again. says it's going to keep interest rates where they are, near 0%. and it also says it's going to keep up its bond-buying program. the markets like what they heard from the fed along with a pledge from the new head of japan central bank about its own bold, easing measures to be unvailed on thursday. as a result, stocks moved higher here about. the dow touching an all-time intraday high. the blue chips did close 56 higher. nasdaq up by 25 and the s&p 500 rose for the first time in four sessions adding 10 points and taking us to within a few of an all-time high. steve leaseman tells us where we go from here. >> the federal reserve voting 11 to 1 to keep its policy in place and purchasing $85 billion a month in treasury and mortgage-backed securities in an effort to drive down long-term interest rates. but the federal reserve chairman in the press conference after the statement came out, sug
's effort to stimulate the economy. and the fed chairman made comments about what's going on in cyprus and the economic and financial difficulties in that small country. >> so a lot of uncertainties and questions about how the way cyprus has created for other countries and the like. it does have some consequence. having said that, you know, the vote failed and the markets are up today. and i don't think that the impact has been enormous. >> finally, the federal reserve in its statement for the first time made mention of fiscal restraint, which is another way of saying the sequestration that many analysts did not think was going to happen. fed chairman did say that he has concerns that reducing federal spending could reduce economic growth. back to you guys. >> well, two big companies that could be considered bellwether to the economy had two big misses today. oracle, the world's third largest software maker came in shy as new software sales sell. on the numbers, oracle shares took a big hit. >>> and the other miss, fed-ex, the company reported weakness in international market as well a
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecedented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watching the tiny island nation again today, in a show of hands-on opposition, party members voted no on a tax and 10% of bank deposits, a condition set by eurozone officials to secure 10 billion euro bailout. many called it extortion. ruling party members abstained saying beyond saying no they need to find another plan.
economy. its banks are not highly connected with the rest of the international financial system. there is no risk of contagion here. >> adam, actually, of all the ideas you laid out, which do you think is the least bad of all those solutions? is it going ahead and letting the banks fail? >> that would be my preferred route. failure implies that the banks can't pay their depositors. they are restructuring. they will be very orderly. basically, the banks would be closed for two days. what would come out is when they reopen, the depositors would be the large depositors because the small depositors would be fully protected. the large depositors would be the owners of a bank and they would have deposits of somewhere between 50 1k3 60 or 70% of their money and the rest of the shares in the new bank. the banks would be solvent. the banks could be highly capitalized and they would then have access to the ecb for refinancing to provide any liquidity. >> and the fallout from that would be that the russians -- >> and basically -- >> the fallout for that is that the russians are the ones wh
affect the u.s. economy. presumably including cyprus. as well as the improving u.s. job market, and strong housing sector. and as we wait for fed officials to wrap up their meeting tomorrow, it's expected they will leave interest rates unchanged. joining us to talk more about the fed, randall krosner, former fed governor and now professor of economics at the university of chicago. i've not had the benefit of being in those meetings. you have, and i'm curious to know, do you think cyprus came up? if so, how? and how would the fed governors and members of the fomc handicap its possible effects on the u.s. economy? >> it certainly would have come up, i think, if some analogies with iceland from a number of years ago. even a smaller country, only 250,000 people, not a million people, but it was something that we focused on. we worried about and tried to think of what the implications are. here it's clear the europeans have made i think a terrible mistake in making this proposal. that potentially could undermine confidence, and that could have knock-on effects not only for the whole
the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. neil: government officials say they want to clean up the tax code. to make a very serious point, the government is looking at a uniform internet tax. when we were told would never happen. on top of the other taxes that we were told would never happen. this federal internet tax, i am telling you, get ready for it. it i coming soon. charles payne and melissa francis they do not expect it to stay at the levels for long. it is here, the question is whether europe starts low and high. >> you are right, it opens the gate to that. but it makes you very nervous. one of the things about buying online is that a lot of the ti
safe financial move it could hurt young adults and economy as a whole. brenda buttner, anchor of "bulls and bears." i guess it's a story here is that young people are avoiding debt and not getting sort of themselves mixed up in some of these predatory practices that young people have been the target in the past. so had a part of the story is good, right? >> absolutely. during the great recession everybody stopped using their credit cards but particularly those under 35. especially undergraduates as you brought up. in a sense that is good, whenever you hear from a personal financial expert, get some extra money, pay off your credit card debt, but having no credit and misusing credit are two different things and could have potentially difficult implications for our economy and for these young adults. >> rick: i remember my mother telling me, go and get one credit card, buy something you need but get your books and put it on the card and then pay it off in full. that is the way to start establishing a good credit? >> who is your mom. eileen -- that is good advice to your son. that is exact
. the economist is out with a report on our economy's saying that our economy is in better shape than you think. we're back with that in a moment. first, i want to give a shout out to my grandmother mabel. she convinced her nursing home to switch cable providers just to see the cycle every day. go, mabel! [ jackie ] it's just so frustrating... ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaucoma, or can not empty your bladder, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz can cause blurred vision, dizziness, drowsiness and decreased sweating. do not drive, operate machinery or do unsafe tasks until you know how tovia
when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> i like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness the husqvarna all-wheel-drive mower is here. engineered with a unique drive system and dual transmission. all-wheel traction. all-wheel power. all done. only from husqvarna. challenge the impossible. all your imptant legal matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. got you ! you cannot escape the rebel forces ! ahhh. got you ! got ya ! gotcha ! got ya. that's all you got, brother ? take that. never having to surrender the things thamatter. gotcha. that's powerful. verizon. [inaudible] >> keep up the good work. >> thank you. neil: if jimmy fallon does get "the tonight show" and it does come to new york, the joke ultimately could be on businesses already in new york. because andrew cuomo's new budget would give this show a huge tax break
. connell: highest level close to five years. the economy may be improving. the problem for president obama is his approval rating is not. 47% of americans approving. doug shaw is here to answer that. a record-breaking run last week. you have home production neared the unemployment rate falling. >> first of all, we have dysfunction in washington. we do not have a budget deal. economic growth was tested in the fourth quarter. there is no sign that it is reviving. there really is no revival on main street. connell: is there something politically bad be done? is there something they are not doing right? shouldn't they be better able to take advantage of the perfect stock market and little bit better economic numbers? i think the president is trying to do that now, connell. reaching out to the public senators and paul ryan. we made a deal on the but with newt gingrich. the same thing needs to be done now. dagen: something really struck me. i do not mean to harp on it. the average american wakes up in the morning, you tell me how he feels or she feels that deficit with the daily impact. you kind
and the new fed forecast for the economy. and the stocks we're focused on this morning, blackberry getting an upgrade at morgan stanley and a note titled why it won't go down and it gets into the best buy bull camp, and calling it the best near-term idea in the sector. let's get straight to fedex. the package delivery company says it earned $1.23 a share in the fiscal third quarter and below wall street forecasts. fedex says the customers were choosing slower transit services. this does happen, of course, after a massive run in the transports. >> one of the things that amazes me about fedex is they keep missing and they get loved a few days later. missed and gets loved. it's still regarded as being a profit machine. they have this restructuring that people like very much. people feel it's only a matter of time before someone steps up to the more expensive freight. to me, my charitable trust owns ups. ups has the expectations lower. scott davis always says negative things. >> melissa hit the nail on the head. the stock had a big run and the two guys were going head to head over what was in
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that's part of it, all right, but all of the rest of this has to be added together, or we can never reconstruct this country. we will not get the pillars of american exceptionalism back together. [applause] unless we have the full spectrum. if we can restore our families and strengthen our faith and protect innocent, unborn human life instead of assaulting it with a half a billion dollars appropriated to planned parenthood in a single year. that's gotta go. obamacare has got to go. [cheers and applause] we can't let up on obamacare and believe that somehow we're going to capitulate to that side because the roads are vitality, and it is an unconstitutional taking of god-given american liberty, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise
when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness [inaudible] >> keep up the good work. >> thank you. neil: if jim fallon does get "the tonight show" and it does come to new york, the joke ultimately could be on businesses already in new york. because andrew cuomo's new budget would give this show a huge tax break for moving into the big apple. other companies are saying, hello, what about us, we have been struggling in the big apple and have not left the big apple. we have been supporting the big apple. why not give us a break for sustaining the big apple? sporting-goods ceo mitch mundell is one of them would he think. >> i applaud the governor. it's going to create jobs. it is all about job creation. you know better than everyone. >> it will bring people to new york, hire more people for the hotels and restaurants. >> i think he will be tremendous. at th
coming up. in the next hour we're going to be talking the economy and the dow with jennifer ericsson from the center for american progress, and then we'll talk about cpac and james homan was at cpac and he'll be here in studio with us. the president is kind of kicking back this morning. he has private meetings in the morning, getting the daily briefing and then at 4:40 this afternoon we'll be delivering marks at a women's history gathering. another hour of the "full court press" coming up. [♪ theme music ♪] >> bill: good morning, everybody. itit i is s mondayayararchch 1 18th. welcome to the "full court press" here on current tv. we're bringing you up to date on all of the latest developments here in our nation's capitol, around the country and the globe, whatever is happening we'll tell you about it. and you get to tell us what it means to you by giving us a call at 866-55-press, joining us on twitter @bpshow, and there is a civil war among republicans. sarah palin said karl rove if he's so smart he ought to go back to texas and run for office, and karl ro
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there is going to be a job in their field. those in the workforce will know they will be needed. those in retirement, social security and medicare and those will be strengthened and security. an exciting time. guest: -- the: when it comes to continued resolution which funds the government through september, did it include sequester cuts that took effect earlier this month? spending atcludes the sequester level. there is flex ability for the military, department of defense and a few other areas that allow money to be moved to areas of
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
in washington. is something going to get done this year, and would a balanced budget hurt the economy? joining me for debate, the republican wlip in the house, kevin mccarthy, and the top democrat on the budget committee, congressman chris van hollen. >> we'll talk about the future of the republican party, and >> we'll talk about the future of the republican party, and republican governor scott walker for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. like a squirrel stashes nuts, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® liquid gels. nothing starts working faster than zyrtec® at relieving your allergy symptoms for 24 hours. zyrtec®. love the air. >>> on tuesday, the day a new pope was installed in rome, president obama makes a sensitive trip to the holy land for his first presidential trip to israel. the trip isn't ambitious. mostly the president seems to be responding to critics who question why he's n
revenues. it would cut waste, add jobs and spur economic growth of the economy. it would reduce the deficit by an additional $1.8 trillion without jeopardizing the recovery or harming the middle class. it includes $1.2 trillion in new revenue obtained not by tax increases but by closing loopholes and eliminating wasteful spending that benefits the wealthiest americans and the largest corporations. it eliminates $4 billion in annual tax breaks to the oil and gas industry, an industry that is making profits. they don't need a tax break. in fact, they're making enormous profits. so, why does the ryan budget give them a government subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion
the day. from the economy to earnings now. we get a number of interesting quarterly reports due today as well. before the bell, we'll hear from fedex, general mills and lennar and this afternoon we have oracle. a lot to chew on for the markets. s&p by the way coming off its first three-day decline of 2013. take a look at u.s. equity futures at this hour. green arrows across the board. and then of course there's cyprus. the country's leaders are holding crisis talks today trying it avert a financial meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignan
. let's take a pause to digest all of what's going on. >> there are two economies here. kb homes, lennar, sherwin williams, whirlpool. there is the economy defined by fedex, by caterpillar and this morning by yorele cal. i was on the call last night. the cisco downgrade today. this dichotomy is allowing i think bernanke to not have to taper off. at the same time it calls into question how weak is that international market. seems very weak. >> did we get largely what we wanted from the fed yesterday? there were no big surprises within that. >> no. i think that was the point to not have any big surprises. i think there was a poignant moment yesterday that i think wasn't talked about enough where someone asked imputedly, i felt, because ben bernanke deserves better -- do you know anybody that's unemployed? do you note price of a gallon of milk? he came back, yes, i have a relative on unemployment. he's going to get unemployment down then we'll talk about tapering. until then we are playing a parlor game with the fed. i believe bernanke when he says these things. >> there's no reason to beli
requirement to have a -- growth perspective of employers. mr. deputy speaker, a vital sector for our economy and the cost of doing business is energy. creating a low carbon economy is done by create jobs rather than -- was a major step forward for new nuclear. today with help of we are also announcing our intelligence to take two projects to the next stage of development will support the manufacture of mission vessels in britain with new takes incentive and the honorable members has urged do you passionately and in a nonpartisan way about the damage of doing the famous ceramic industry and persuaded me we will exempt from next year the industrial processes for the industry and others from the climate change. [cheering and applause] [laughter] >> for the we will this year sign contracts for the commissioning relief, the expectations of which is already increasing investment. i want britain to tap to new sources of local energy like shale gas. i'm introducing a tax -- including a shale gas field allowance to promote early investment. shale gas is part of the future and we'll make it happen. we
the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> i like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mtch saying my goodness alec, for this mission i uraded your smart phone. ♪ right. but the most important feature of all is... the capital one purchase eraser. i can redeem the double miles i earned with my venture card to erase recent travel purchases. d with a few clicks, this mission never happened. uh, what's this button do? [ electricity zaps ] ♪ you requested backup? yes. yes i did. what's in your wallet? ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you engineer a true automotive breakthrough? ♪ you give it bold styling, unsurpassed luxury and nearly 1,000 improvements. the redesigned 2013 glk. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. [inaudible] >> keep up the good work. >> thank you. neil: if jimmy fallon does get "the tonight show" and it does come to new york, the joke ultimately
and the austerity he is putting in place has caused the economy to be really slow. >> a lot of tax increases over there in europe. we look at this austerity bit. i want to talk about this for a second. >> i want to get back to the budget then. >> talk about what is happening in washington. you know, economics discussed on tv or on the internet or on twitter, it's so depressing, because people really don't know what they are talking about and they just sort of boil it down and there is this belief through the years, that tax cuts are not a tool used. of course, tax cuts are a tool used and tax increases something that traditional are against in bad times. we hear about austerity across great britain and we never hear about the tax increases. when you talk about the fact they cut and slash spending at the same time they hike taxes, it really was a formula made to fail. >> spending cuts and tax increases both take money out of the economy and slow the economy and, yes, they create this idea of austerity. but, look. it's a balancing problem. on the one hand you need to deal with it budgets and defici
want to discourage. at a time when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> i like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take idea and ke it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalom.com we put the law on your side. a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something import
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
that the eurozone crisis may be impacting that region's biggest economy. crude fell 1.1% settling, $92.45 a barrel. sandra: miners outperforming as gold ends the session higher, still above the $1600 mark which everybody is watching im gold and newmont mining, barrick gold, kinross, all top performers up, between two and 4%. adam: you like banks? financial sector feeling the squeeze again as the turmoil in cypress continues to play out without a resolution. goldman sachs and morgan stanley, they led the declines. sandra: who needs a wallet? the mobile payment industry is one of the fastest growing areas in tech. $171 billion. we're telling you how to add some cash it your portfolio by investing in this cashless trend. adam: we've got new data out showing more consumers are cutting the chord and saying good-bye to pay it. v services. time warner, are you listening? does the trend mean you should say good-bye to cable stocks? a top on lift tells us which names will feel the pain and which ones will ride this trend to cash success. "after the bell" starts right now. sandra: first we'll tell you what
if constant budget deficits are going to ruin the economy they're taking an awful long time about doing so. the real fact about the budget is that the deficit has to be sustainable. but basically the government is a lot more like a company than it is like a household. and a company has debt as part of its permanent capital structure and it can have that debt forever. if the company keeps grog, it can take on more debt. similarly if we run a budget deficit, so long as it is small enough relative to the amount of economy is growing over the long-term that can be sustainable. we have to shrink the budget deficit over time, but not all the way to zero. the democrats are closer to correct on this point where the republicans have been attacking them because their budget doesn't balance over ten years. the budget shouldn't balance over ten years. >> i think you hit a key point. it's all about growth. you can grow your way out of deficits. we saw it during the clinton administration. it's also about looking at how far we've come. if you actually look at what we've already done in terms of getting
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
companies. real innovative companies popping up. that is what i worry about the u.s. economies. where are those bold innovative companies. and i would make another footnote about the buybacks. yes, record numbers since 2009. but that is because the feds are buying back their own shares. they say let them pass the stress test. they really struggle and diluted earnings per share. diluted their capital base with a lot of shares during the crisis. they have basically flooded the market to recapitalize and buying it back. the. neil: in cyprus explodes and banks reopened, let's see what happens to the residents of cyprus. people say oh, we are there for you. then you realize that they aren't. have a good weekend >> welcome, i am shibani joshi and four gerri willis. we will tackle the new blackberry. as i don't have anything to worry about? we will discover andalk about that as well. and the faa starts to close air traffic control towers. we will tell you how that ca affect your travel plans going into the spring. but first, raising $8.5 billion and euros needed to see the bailout from the e
's on somewhat shaky ground, the economy is bad, and part of the problem is the refugees are a huge pressure point as the king sort of eloquently said today. few of us saw the foreign minister this afternoon who said it's almost as if-- he said it's as if another eight or nine, the king said 10% has been added to our population. the foreign minister said eye asked him the question the king was asked, would you ever shut your doors? and he said we just can't do that. but i have to say my nightmare scenario is i get a call at 3:00 a.m. and i'm told there are 50,000 refugees at the border, what do we do? >> margaret, just to wrap up quickly, we know the bulk of the president's time was spent in israel, trying to patch up relations there, but also calling for new thinking on the part of the israelis and palestinians. have you picked up reaction yet to what the president was saying? >> jied, in the public, especially in the left in israel, there was great-- great joy at what the president had to say about resolving the conflict. but the reaction from people sort of in the political circles was a
care system is the largest economy in the world. we spend on health care more than the french spend on everything for 66 million people. >> of the three brothers, while he is the author of the book, he's not the one most people know from television, which doesn't mean he hasn't done television. >> here's zeke. zeke emanuel, a smart kid from harvard, now a yank at oxford. >> this was an early tv reality show called "now get out of that" which aired on the bbc in 1981. it was part intellectual challenge, part physical, obstacles, problem solving. and as you'll hear, it's not just zeke's chicago accent that sets him apart, it's how he throws himself into and at everything. >> but says you may not walk inside the area. >> that's what it says here, walk. >> later in the bog area -- >> hang on. >> it's not a top. it's a milk can or something. >> then in the water. >> this ain't no raft. where's the rubber dinghy. >> at 27 he shows physique and courage, but always leads with his brain. >> you have to hand it to zeke. he may be pushy, but where would they be without him? >> which brings us
that the economy is not growing. all wee doing is spending more money for the things that we buy and so it's a charade, a facade. looks like we're growing, but we're contracting. i think that's going to get worse as time goes on. shibani: fueled by money printing. peter, aays great to have you on. thank you very much for joining us today. >> you're welcome. shibani: switching gears and giving lou dobbs a chance of this. if the tiny med trainian island collapses, does it take the entire eurozone with it? i saw you taking notes. i know you want to jump in here, thghts on what peter said? >> peter, i always enjoy listening to his perspective on e world. he said that cypress, you know, could happen anywhere. he did later acknowledge it was an extreme example of banking and sovereignty gone wrong. here's the reality. cypress i now learning th it made serious mistakes. it tried to take the eurozone, the european commission, the international monetary fund and the e. cb to the brink. they play ad like fools. that's how they got in this position. they were reminded of that by the russians who reje
capital economy will flea to lower tax states. >> we have the right to change the rules op you after the fact, and that's what's nos fair. >> some in sacramento are trying to unwind this. california's not cypress, it's not taking, but to many, it is clearly unfair. >> no, it is. it is so unfair. i mean, changing the rules after the fact is crazy. william thank you for the report. >> you bet. >> well, in the mean time, a huge win if you're one who likes to resell things from ebay to yard sales, and itch ed -- rich edson in washington. rich? >> e bay and overstock.com love the decision. publishers, not so much. the supreme court questioned whether a student could buy cheaper, foreign made and sold textbooks and resell them in the united states for profit. copyrights permits sales only overseas, but the courts said no. once americans buy an item, they buy and resell it of the the other decision could have made it difficult to resell foreign items in the u.s.. libraries say the decision is a landmark win for consumers, small businesses, online marketplaces, retailers, and libraries natio
, giving spirit. visualize a future where the economy is growing at a steady pace, entrepreneurs are building businesses, taking risks, innovating, investing, employing millions of americans come and as they employ these americans, they move them up the economic ladder. we are able to pay off our debt. they are confident and proud of their country. partys a vision tea patriots have for america's future. [cheers and applause] a constitutionally limited, fiscally responsible government, where free markets thrive. [applause] and for this vision, we have been mocked, marginalized, and maligned by president obama, nancy pelosi's, and majority leader harry reid. and people from the republican establishment, like senators john mccain and lindsey graham. our are contemptuous of vision, and our vision is distinctly different from today's reality. our country is $17 trillion in debt, and we are headed to bankruptcy. our gross domestic product shrunk, and wall street profits it. seven out of the 10 wealthiest counties in america are right here in boom town d.c. like "the hunger games." corr
back the economy and the g.o.p. believes mr. obama is creating a nation at war with itself. the affluent vs. the nonaffluent. over the weekend senator ted cruze of texas, a conservative, delivered a very emotional speech at cpac. >> my father came from cuba. he had been in prison. he had been tortured in cuba. and he came to texas with nothing, with 100 in his underwear. didn't speak a word of english. washed dishes making 50 cents an hour. in someone had came up to that 18-year-old kid avenue as he was washing dishes and suggested to him that 55 years hence his son would be sworn into office as a united states senator representing the great state of texas. [ applause ] that would have been unimaginable. >> now mr. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily by his maternal grandparents in hawaii. h
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